So, How was Sweden doing in 2020?

On this blog all through 2020 I’ve been tracking the number of excess deaths recorded by statistics Sweden and for some part of the year, it looked like the number of deaths was around the same as the average of the years 2015-2019.

Now, it’s February 2021 and it’s a good moment to look at the whole year of 2020. The data is from Statistics Sweden at scb.se under Preliminär statistik över döda (Excel). The file is being updated regularly, I picked the one on Feb. 7, 2021:

Fig. 1 – Number of deaths per day Sweden

As we can see, towards the end of the year the number of deaths did increase again compared the the average of years 2015-2019.
These “excess” deaths are normally attributed by some people to the effects of COVID-19, however that is a stretch at this point and you’d have to look at other data to see whether this is actually the case here or whether there were also other factors contributing to a higher number of deaths in 2020 than in the average in years 2015 to 2019.

US Coronavirus Numbers – By State and Territory Dec 24, 2020

An update on the coronavirus situation in terms of hospitalizations and deaths in the United States, all 56 States and Territories. Data is from covidtracking.com and up-to-date as of December 24, 2020. Note, however, that due to holidays, reporting might be delayed.
First, overview of hospitalizations across the United States (large version is on Google Drive):

Data for most states shows a significant upward movement of hospitalizations. Most obvious increase happens in California and New York.

Second, overview of daily deaths across the United States (large version is on Google Drive):

And finally, the comparison of states as to the number of deaths due to COVID-19 per 100,000 inhabitants, as of Dec. 24, 2020:

US Coronavirus Numbers – By State and Territory Nov 16, 2020

An update on the coronavirus situation in terms of hospitalizations and deaths in the United States, all 56 States and Territories. Data is from covidtracking.com and accurate as of November 16, 2020.
First, overview of hospitalizations across the United States (large version is on Google Drive):

Data for most states shows a visible upward movement of hospitalizations.

Second, overview of daily deaths across the United States (large version is on Google Drive):

And finally, the comparison of states as to the number of deaths due to COVID-19 per 100,000 inhabitants:

US Hospitalisation & Deaths Numbers – State-by-State

I thought it would be nice to have a nice and quick visual presentation that shows, how the different states of the United States compare in terms of of COVID19 hospitalisations and deaths numbers, including D.C., Puerto Rico and US Territories. It’s been done with R and with data from covidtracking.com. The data is going up to Sep. 24, 2020:

There are larger version of these charts (4096x4096px) for viewing and download :

There’s also a chart comparing the deaths numbers of the 56 US states, territories and possessions, which also was made with R and data from covidtracking.com (date current until Sep. 24, 2020):

Hospitalization Data for Texas – September 4, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of September 04, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days, but seems to have slowed a bit:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

For completeness, I include the data on total beds and icu beds available and occupied, however, the data is incomplete and I am not sure how accurately it describes reality:

Fig. 4 – Available and Occupied Beds and ICU Beds April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

If the data is accurate Texas is not – and was not – in danger of running out of available beds and icu beds.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – August 29, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of August 29, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – August 22, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of August 21, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

It’s also interesting to compare total hospitalizations to total available beds:

Fig. 4 – Total beds compared to hospitalizations in all of Texas April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

You’ll note that for July 17 and July 22, 2020, there are more beds occupied than are available.

With the last chart is important to note that not all hospitals report all numbers in a timely manner. Or as Texas DSHS notes:

DSHS is reporting incomplete hospitalization numbers 7/23-7/28 due to a transition in reporting to comply with new federal requirements. DSHS continues to work with Texas hospitals during this transition to ensure all facilities can fully report the data required.

Daily Hospitalizatons & Deaths Numbers for United States – State by State

Updated chart showing a state-by-state comparison of hospitalization and deaths numbers. It shows 56 US states, possessions and territories (such as Guam and Puerto Rico) the y-axis is scaled the same for all sub-charts which makes them easily comparable and gives you a quick overview how the absolute numbers compare.

The chart was produced with data from covidtrackin.com with data current as of Aug. 18, 2020 and was written in R.

First, total hospitalizations on any given day (full 4800x4800px version):

Second, daily new deaths (full 4800x4800px version):