Hospitalization Data for Texas – April 08, 2021

Two weeks ago, we looked at the situation of hospitalizations in Texas, three weeks after Governor Abbott lifted all COVID19 restrictions in Texas, and as was noted, there was no rise in hospitalizations. Now another two weeks later, we’ll have a second look to see whether hospitalizations picked up or not. The data is again from the Texas Department of Health Services and current as of April 8, 2021.

Fig. 1 – Texas Total Lab-Confirmed COVID-19 hospitalization over time

Hospitalizations are much lower, but seem to have leveled off for now. So, it’s still don’t look to bad now and there is no sign of an uptick in hospitalizations so far, but lets still keep an eye on this situation and re-visit the data in two weeks.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – March 26, 2021

As you may recall, Texas Governor Greg Abbott lifted all COVID-19 restrictions in the State of Texas as of March 3, 2021. So, a bit more than three weeks into this, it’s time to have a first look at how the State of Texas is doing in terms of numbers. The data is from the Texas Department of Health Services and current as of March 26, 2021.

The green curve shows the situation in Texas statewide. While the blue, red and yellow curves show the situation in TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) Dallas/Fort Worth, San Antonio and Houston. I focused on these TSAs in previous posts, because they were the largest contributors in terms of total number of hospitalizations.

Fig. 1 – Texas Total Lab-Confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations over time

That don’t look too bad so far. Let’s check back again a week from now.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – October 12, 2020

An update of hospitalization data in Texas. The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is as of Oct. 12, 2020.

The downward movement of the total number of hospitalizations had stopped approximately three weeks ago and started to go up again after that. It’s still going up:

Fig. 1 – Total hospitalizations in Texas Apr 12, 2020 – Oct 12, 2020

Let’s see whether this is a rise across all TSAs or whether there are local differences.
The three main contributing TSAs in terms of number of hospitalizations are still E- Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston.
Houston after going down has leveled off. San Antonio also has leveled off too, but Dallas/Fort Worth is rising:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q Apr 12, 2020 – Oct 12, 2020

So we might want to conclude that the increase in hospitalizations seems to be due to local increases.
Let’s look at the other TSAs, where previously, V- Lower Rio Grande Valley was the main contributor.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q Apr 12, 2020 – Oct 12, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley continues to go down, but now I – El Paso and A – Amarillo are coming up with El Paso now having more hospitalizations than Lower Rio Grande Valley. Other are stable – with some fluctuations up or down.

This shows the same image as above: The increase in hospitalizations looks like it is local in three to four TSAs.

These were the absolute numbers of COVID19 hospitalizations, but how do these compare to the hospital capacity over time?

Fig. 3 – COVID19 hospitalizations compared to hospital capacity Apr 12, 2020 – Oct 12, 2020

It’s now slightly above 5%, at its peak it was slightly below 20%.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – September 26, 2020

This is the weekly update of hospitalisation data in Texas. As usual, the source of the data is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is as of Sep. 25, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalisations in Texas seems to have stopped and levelled off :

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalisations in Texas April 12, 2020 – September 25, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston, but Houston has now less hospitalisations than Dallas/Fort Worth:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalisations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 25, 2020

E – Dallas/Fort Worth and P – San Antonio look like they are going up again, if only slightly. If this is a new trend remains to be seen.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalisations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 20, 2020

The main driver V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still going down, but for most others it looks like the either are stable or are going slightly up.

Conclusion: The downtrend we saw last week did not continue and for the moment, numbers are stable. We’ll have to see which way this will go in the next week.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – September 20, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of September 20, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days, but seems to have slowed a bit:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – September 20, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston, but Houston has now less hospitalizations than Dallas/Fort Worth:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 20, 2020

All other TSAs have also come down, V – Lower Rio Grande Valley even significantly so:

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 20, 2020

Conclusion: Texas looks promising at the moment in terms of persons who require hospitalizations due to COVID-19.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – September 4, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of September 04, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days, but seems to have slowed a bit:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

For completeness, I include the data on total beds and icu beds available and occupied, however, the data is incomplete and I am not sure how accurately it describes reality:

Fig. 4 – Available and Occupied Beds and ICU Beds April 12, 2020 – September 04, 2020

If the data is accurate Texas is not – and was not – in danger of running out of available beds and icu beds.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – August 29, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of August 29, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 29, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

Hospitalization Data for Texas – August 22, 2020

The data source is Texas Department of Health Services and the data is up to data as of August 21, 2020.

The downward movement of total number of hospitalizations in Texas continued past seven days:

Fig. 1 – Total number of hospitalizations in Texas April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

The three main contributing TSAs (Trauma Service Areas) are still E – Dallas/Fort Worth, P – San Antonio and Q – Houston:

Fig. 2 – Hospitalizations in TSAs E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

Houston has almost come down to the same level of hospitalizations as Dallas/Fort Worth and all three are going down in numbers.

Fig. 3 – Hospitalizations in all TSAs except E, P, Q April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

V – Lower Rio Grande Valley is still the largest contributor, but still coming down nicely. O – Austin is also reducing hospitalizations in a significant manner.

It’s also interesting to compare total hospitalizations to total available beds:

Fig. 4 – Total beds compared to hospitalizations in all of Texas April 12, 2020 – August 21, 2020

You’ll note that for July 17 and July 22, 2020, there are more beds occupied than are available.

With the last chart is important to note that not all hospitals report all numbers in a timely manner. Or as Texas DSHS notes:

DSHS is reporting incomplete hospitalization numbers 7/23-7/28 due to a transition in reporting to comply with new federal requirements. DSHS continues to work with Texas hospitals during this transition to ensure all facilities can fully report the data required.